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20110701
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Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
worse. dr. jon lapook on why bladder cancer patients almost never get the recommended treatment. and a pilot crashed into lake huron. >> i'm, like, oh, my god, you survived a plane crash, now you're going to drown. >> schieffer: then came the hard part: lasting 18 hours in 10- foot waves. dean reynolds has his amazing survival story. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> schieffer: good evening. scott is off tonight, i'm bob schieffer. the house finally passed the republican plan to raise the debt limit tonight, but that's just one step, and the days are now dwindling down to a precious few. here's how it looks tonight. as of today, the government has less than $39 billion on hand to pay its bills. by tuesday, it will be less than $26 billion; by wednesday, less than $15 billion. but here's where the crunch comes: on wednesday, the government will owe $23 billion to social security recipients. we've got a team of correspondents on this important story tonight, and we're going to start at the capitol with nancy cordes. nancy? >> reporter
the recommended treatment. here's dr. jon lapook. >> think it's ready? >> yup. >> reporter: six years ago, adam schaffer was enjoying thanksgiving with his family until... >> i went to the bathroom and there was a whole bunch of red and it was very scary. >> reporter: he was just 44 years old. the doctors diagnosis floored him. >> he says "you have bladder cancer." and you could feel the room spinning. >> reporter: his first doctor removed the tumor but did not follow up with standard recommended treatment. failure to follow guidelines is dangerously common and one reason bladder cancer survival has not improved in 25 years says u.c.l.a.'s dr. karim chamie. >> if we were to get a report card based on our performance with these guideline measures i would say we bead failing. >> reporter: for the first two years after finding early bladder cancer, doctors are supposed to test the urine for abnormal cells and examine the inside of the bladder every three months. they're also supposed to fill it with an anticancer drug at least six times. but among 4,500 patients only one receive tad recommended ca
in a brazen attack. cell phone safety: to all those minutes add up to health problems for kids? dr. jon lapook reports. and it's a place where wounded warriors learn to hope again. david martin on the closing of walter reed. captioning sponsored by cbs this is the "cbs evening news" with scott pelley. >> schieffer: good evening, scott's off tonight. i'm bob schieffer. the fallout from washington's inability to find a solution to the budget crisis and raise the debt limit has, apparently, begun. on wall street, the stock market was down for the third day in a row. the dow fell more than 198 point today. for the week, it's down nearly 400 points, and it has lost close to $105 billion in value. some of the bond rating services are now saying that even if congress does reach an agreement on a budget plan, it may be too late to avoid lowering the rating on some american securities. we have three reports tonight on that and what it means for small business and your credit card. and we start with anthony mason. anthony. >> reporter: bob, america's credit rating has never fallen below triple "a,"
. dr. jon lapook has more on that. >> reporter: with a generation of kids connected to each other through cell phones, doctors like keith black have concerns about safety. >> what we know is that the microwave radiation from cell phones will penetrate deeper into the child's brain and more of the radiation goes into the brain because the scalp is thinner, the skull is thinner. >> reporter: in today's study, researchers compared cell phone use in healthy children and 352 brain tumor patients between the ages of seven and 19. cell phone use did not significantly increase the risk of a brain tumor. this research comes just two months after the world health organization categorized cell phones as possibly carcinogenic. 75% of teenagers now have a cell phone, up from fritsch% in 2004 so a clearer picture of safety will only come from long-term study. >> what we're really concerned about is the child who begins using the cell phone at seven or 12, when they become an adult after 20 or 30 years of using the cell phone, is their risk higher? that is not answered by this study. >> reporter
" sunday, we'll have the key players from all sides: white house chief of staff bill daley and senators jon kyl, dick durban, mark warner and saxby chambliss. that's sunday on "face the nation." oslo, norway, is where the nobel peace prize is awarded, but today the city known for peace was marred by terrible violence. a powerful bomb exploded near the prime minister's office. he was not hurt, but at least seven people are dead and 15 were injured there. shortly after that, a man dressed in a police uniform opened fire with a rifle on a group of young people at a resort island. police say at least nine were killed there. an arrest was made in that shooting and police believe the two incidents are connected. we begin our coverage with jeff glor in oslo. jeff? >> reporter: bob, good evening to you. oslo is clearly a city shaken tonight. the prime minister of norway called this day "brutal." the explosions ripped through downtown oslo at 3:30 local time. the first images: windows blown out, rubble in the streets, huge plumes of smoke, evoking memories of terror attacks elsewhere but up until no
a prayer for today's meeting then you have senator jon kyl, a republican, saying that the white house essentially walked away from $500 billion in cuts that the do sides had already agreed to so no one right now can point to any progress that these talks are achieving. >> pelley: senator mcconnell proposed a stopgap plan today in case they miss the deadline. what was that about? >> well, it's a pretty complicated plan, scott, and it essentially boils down to allowing the president to raise the debt limit in fits and starts over the next year and a half and essentially puts off any talk of spending cuts to a later date. the plan went over with a thud among house republicans who see this as giving in, but mcconnell says that he doesn't want to be a party to default and he certainly doesn't want republicans to be blamed if there is a default, scott. >> pelley: thanks, nancy. this deal to reduce the deficit could be huge. somewhere between $1 and $4 trillion. they're talking about taxes, social security, medicare, defense and most everyone agrees thisv it has to be done by next week to gi
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)